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Showing 2 of 2 dates for this event.
Dates available from 10 May 2019 until 14 May 2019

Event date: 10May 2019

Friday 10 May 2019

Dr Luis Zea, Assistant Research Professor, BioServe Space Technologies, University of Colorado, Boulder

  • 3.00pm - 4.00pm

Auditorium, 147 Underwood Avenue, Floreat, WA

Event date: 14May 2019

Tuesday 14 May 2019

Dr Heping Zhang, CSIRO Agriculture and Food

  • 3.00pm - 4.00pm

Auditorium, 147 Underwood Avenue, Floreat, WA

More information

Dr Luis Zea, Assistant Research Professor, BioServe Space Technologies, University of Colorado, Boulder
Life sciences investigations performed in space – what and why

Friday 10 May 2019
3.00pm - 4.00pm
Auditorium, 147 Underwood Avenue, Floreat WA

Abstract:

Life has evolved on Earth during the last billions of years under different environmental conditions, including changing temperatures and atmospheric gas compositions. Something that has remained the same, however, is gravity. Space-based research enables treating gravity as an independent variable and not a constant, and this has the potential of unmasking molecular and biological processes otherwise unexplored on Earth. The microgravity environment of spaceflight is currently used for medical research, including cancer-, osteoporosis-, and muscle dystrophy-related studies. Beyond covering these cases, this seminar focuses on bacteria-related investigations, including biofilm formation and drug resistance. For this purpose, the Antibiotic Effectiveness in Space experiment is used as an example, where Escherichia coli was cultured onboard the International Space Station, and which resulted in the formulation of a biomolecular model that may explain some of the altered bacterial behavior observed in space. Phenotypic results – related to growth, shape, and aggregation – are covered, as well as the potential unmasking of a putative activator of bacterial ‘suicide genes’.

Bio:

Luis is an aerospace engineer and gravitational biology scientist who has been involved in over a dozen experiments performed on the Space Shuttle and/or International Space Station as an engineer, project manager, and/or scientist. He focuses on bacterial research, namely drug resistance and biofilm formation in space. Through his work at BioServe Space Technologies, he has also supported other spaceflight scientific projects ranging from male fertility to cancer studies. What these experiments have in common is that they use the microgravity environment of space to find innovative solutions to problems on Earth. Luis has seen first-hand the benefits that space based research and assets can have for people on Earth and is therefore passionate about the democratization of access to space, and international collaboration for space exploration.


Dr Heping Zhang, CSIRO Agriculture and Food
Exploring new technology and genotype by environment interaction to achieve high and stable canola yield

Tuesday 14 May 2019
3.00pm - 4.00pm
Auditorium, 147 Underwood Avenue, Floreat WA

Abstract:

Canola is the third largest crop in Australia and plays a significant role in Australian farming system. Canola is more sensitive to environmental change than wheat and has been conceived as a riskier crop. The industry has a range of options such as hybrid and open-pollinated (OP) with four herbicide tolerance technologies to accommodate growers’ needs. Heping will discuss the recent trends in canola industry and the role of different technologies. He will discuss how growers can take advantage of new technologies and genotype by environment interaction in different environments from agronomic management and profitability point of view. He will also discuss the potential future areas to lift canola yield in Australia further.

Bio:

Dr Heping Zhang is a principal research scientist with CSIRO Agriculture and Food. He joined CSIRO Land and Water in Perth, WA in 1999 and moved to Agriculture and Food in 2001. Heping was educated in China and gained his PhD in soil science at the University of Reading in the UK in 1996. His early research focused on improving water-use efficiency of wheat in the North China Plain in China and the Mediterranean environment at the International Centre for Agriculture Research in Dry Area (ICARDA). Since joining CSIRO, his research at CSIRO focus on improving the yield of wheat in the high rainfall zone and canola yield across the rainfall zones in Australia.


How to get there: CSIRO Floreat site map

Science areas: General Science

Event type: Conference or seminar