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Showing 3 of 3 dates for this event.
Dates available from 08 Nov 2018 until 20 Nov 2018

Event date: 08Nov 2018

Thursday 8 Nov 2018

Dr Jens D Berger, CSIRO Agriculture and Food

  • Learning from nature: the role of wild relatives in crop improvement - 3:00pm - 4:00pm

Auditorium, 147 Underwood Avenue, Floreat, WA
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Event date: 13Nov 2018

Tuesday 13 Nov 2018

Dr Geoffrey J Puzon, CSIRO Land and Water

  • Insights into the microbial ecology of Naegleria fowleri and its presence in drinking water distribution systems - 3:00pm - 4:00pm

Auditorium, 147 Underwood Avenue, Floreat, WA
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Event date: 20Nov 2018

Tuesday 20 Nov 2018

Maneesha P Ginige, CSIRO Land and Water

  • 3.00pm - 4.00pm

Auditorium, 147 Underwood Avenue, Floreat, WA

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Dr Jens D Berger, CSIRO Agriculture & Food
Learning from nature: the role of wild relatives in crop improvement

Thursday 8 November 2018
3.00pm - 4.00pm
Auditorium, 147 Underwood Avenue, Floreat WA

Abstract:

There is limited genetic and adaptive diversity in many of our crops, reflecting a limited genepool. Wild relatives are typically much more genetically diverse, and their evolutionary lineage far older. Accordingly, there is growing interest in harnessing the genetic and adaptive diversity of crop wild relatives (CWR) to improve the adaptation of elite cultivars to abiotic stresses such as drought. Jens will dip into 2 decades of plant adaptation research to discuss the role wild plants may play in improving the resilience of our crops, journeying from the Mediterranean to the Indian subcontinent.

Bio:

Jens is a team Leader in CSIRO Agriculture & Food, Floreat with more than 20 years' experience in crop adaptation research. His early focus was on the cool-season legumes such as chickpea, lupin and more recently he has added canola and wheat agronomy to his interests.


Dr Geoffrey J Puzon, CSIRO Land and Water
Insights into the microbial ecology of Naegleria fowleri and its presence in drinking water distribution systems

Tuesday 13 November 2018
3.00pm - 4.00pm
Auditorium, 147 Underwood Avenue, Floreat WA

Abstract:

Naegleria are thermophilic free-living amoebae that occur in soil, freshwater lakes and thermal springs. In addition to natural water bodies, man-made thermally elevated waters provide engineered environments favourable for Naegleria growth. In water distribution networks, pipe wall biofilms provide a food source for bacterial grazing eukaryotes, including thermophilic Naegleria, as well as protection from disinfectants. In Australia, many regions have drinking water supply temperatures consistently above 30°C for >4 months annually, providing ideal conditions for biofilm growth and thermophilic Naegleria colonization. While both temperature and bacterial food source are recognized as contributing to the presence of all Naegleria spp., the role of the bacterial composition as supporting eukaryotic organisms in contributing to the presence or absence of pathogenic or non-pathogenic Naegleria species is not well understood. This talk will highlight our findings on the role of the associated microbial ecology that contributes to the presence and persistence of N. fowleri in drinking water distribution systems.

Bio:

Dr Puzon is a microbiologist and Team Leader for the Environmental and Industrial Biotechnology Team in the Environmental Contaminant Mitigation and Biotechnology Program in CSIRO Land and Water. Dr Puzon has extensive experience in drinking water treatment and distribution microbiology, biofilm, pathogens, microbial ecology and bioremediation. Along with his students, Dr Puzon's identifies and develops research targeting the role of microorganisms in complex systems such as drinking water distribution networks and subsurface contaminated aquifers. His team takes a laboratory and field based microbiological approach to provide real world answers to complex problems using both microbiological and Omics techniques.


Dr Maneesha P Ginige, CSIRO Land and Water
Biological recovery of phosphorus from municipal wastewater – An opportunity for utilities and third-party service providers

Tuesday 20 November 2018
3.00pm - 4.00pm
Auditorium, 147 Underwood Avenue, Floreat WA

Abstract:

Phosphorous (P) is fundamental to all living things because it is a building block of DNA, cell membranes, bones, teeth etc. We humans fulfil our P requirements by intake of food and the agriculture industry in turn has a heavy reliance on P fertilisers. P reserves are not evenly distributed on earth and are localised in certain parts of the world. Since P cannot be substituted, there is much concern over a future scarcity of P. Hence, much emphasis is given towards recycling P.

P is limiting in the environment and a discharge of P with treated effluent causes eutrophication in receiving water bodies. Hence, the wastewater industry is compelled to remove P from wastewater before it is discharged into the environment. Significant amount of operational dollars is spent to remove P either biologically and/or chemically from wastewater. Ever increasing operational costs is a significant burden to the industry and this can only be managed by process optimisation and by embracing nutrient (e.g. P) recovery from wastewater, enabling a revenue stream for the wastewater industry.

Over the past few years CSIRO has explored biological strategies to cost effectively introduce P recovery into municipal wastewater treatment plants that are not engineered to biologically remove P from wastewater. In this presentation 3 innovative biological strategies that could be used to recover P will be presented and their pros and cons will be discussed. One of the strategies, specifically examined with activated sludge of a wastewater treatment plant in Western Australia will be discussed in detail with design parameters to effectively concentrate P received with influent.

Bio:

Maneesha is a Senior research scientist of CSIRO Land and Water. He obtained his PhD in Microbiology/Chemical engineering from the Advanced Water Management Centre of University of Queensland. His PhD dissertation was on use of external carbon sources to enhance denitrification. Specifically, he examined the impact the carbon source had on the microbial community of activated sludge. On completing his PhD in 2003, he was offered a postdoctoral fellowship to deliver to an ARC-Linkage project on the same topic. With a close engagement with industry he examined which carbon source is best to enhance denitrification. On completing his postdoctoral fellowship, he joined SCION New Zealand as a research scientist and examined strategies to enhance polyhydroxyalkanoate (a precursor of bioplastics) recovery from pulp and paper waste. Maneesha joined CSIRO in 2007 and since then his research has focused around water & wastewater treatment, recovery of nutrients from wastewater and transforming organic wastes into value added products (e.g. bioplastics).

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